Wild Minds Network

Where wild minds come to rest

Hi

We all suffer from this. Yes it can offer a temprary fix to so many problems. I am sure we do not what to daydream our whole lifes.

 

Can we stop this

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I can't stop by my own will. What helps me, is to concentrate on the real world and to accept my feelings. When I am sad, angry ashamed or have another uncomfortable feeling I try to accept it and to see it like an observer. Then I think: "Ah, this is how sadness (anger, shame...) feels like. This connects me with all the people in the world, because all the people in the world feel this from time to time."

Sometimes this helps, but it could not help me for good.

I think I will stop. Before I did not know what my problem was and thought MD was just helping forget the real problem neither did I know that MD is actually the problem! I felt tired all the time and thought I was maybe sick without realizing that I am always tired bcoz I live in two worlds. We can beat this if we actually admit that MD is not normal.

I think MD causes the Following

Depression

Tiredness

I think MD can kill you if not dealt with.

Hi I get your point and I feel the same way too but i feel one should try and face up to the real world and its problems. I am still young I believe and do not want to day dream my life away. I sometimes dont enjoy the happiness in my real life bcoz I am too consumed by the happiness in my fantasy.



Michelle Young said:

I guess it is all a matter of perspective.  I feel like daydreaming keeps me from getting depressed. There is a lot of depression in my family, and sometimes I feel like I walk that fine line. I really feel like daydreaming helps keep me from falling over the edge. 

I actually like for daydreaming to help me forget my problems. Not all problems are fixable. I would rather take a break from my problems and focus on my world when I can. 

I have never thought that way of it before. Oh my goodness. I think of how dizzy and just "off" I am when I come out of a DD. If I don't do it before bed and just fall asleep - then I get up and I can barely walk for a few minutes. LIke I could black out. Sometimes it's like a euphoria or afterglow or something. But then it turns into a vertigo! That could actually be doing brain damage. I do notice that every year I feel like I'm losing intelligence. And memory. Wonder if it all could be related or a result of the DDing! Yikes.

Bonnie said:

I think I will stop. Before I did not know what my problem was and thought MD was just helping forget the real problem neither did I know that MD is actually the problem! I felt tired all the time and thought I was maybe sick without realizing that I am always tired bcoz I live in two worlds. We can beat this if we actually admit that MD is not normal.

I think MD causes the Following

Depression

Tiredness

I think MD can kill you if not dealt with.

Is this really curable? I would love to think that it is, however, people with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder and asperger's, etc., can't beat their disorders. They are given medicine that may be able to lessen the severity of their disorders, but none of those are beatable disorders. And, MD is considered a disorder by psychologists. So, is it really beatable? I am sure that, if there was medication for what we have, there would be a possibility of lessening our yearning to daydream, but is there really anything we can do that would fully save some MD sufferers from MD? And, people with Schizophrenia and other disorders will never have the right mindset to beat what they suffer from. Do MDers really have the capability to do that? (I don't mean to compare MD to Schizophrenia. I am just using that as an example, because MD is categorized as a disorder, just like Schizophrenia, Bipolar, etc.)
This is an interesting topic. I hope we can find an answer to these questions someday! And, maybe even a method to beat MD someday.

I enjoy daydreaming so much I don' t think I could stop. I was married and it slowed down but when my husband got sick, it got out of control I guess because of the stress. Then he passed away and I pretty much settled into my daydreams. I wish I could have stopped before so I could have been more "there" for my husband but now I don't see much point. I do have a mother I care for and try to focus for her but she has schiz and is in her world a lot of the time too. 

I don't think MDD can KILL you, but it can really mess up your life. I'm "gifted" and get really good grades in school. My daydreams take up a LOT of mental energy. I've tried to stop daydreaming before--I can't. The sad thing is I would probably be even smarter (maybe even a genius or something!) if my daydreams didn't make my brain so tired all the time. Because of MDD I cannot operate at 100% mental capacity and therefore reach my full potential in certain areas.
But then again...I want to be an author when I grow up (it's really the only career that actually sounds enjoyable to me), and if I never developed MDD I would have never developed the right mindset for being an author, either. Plus, writing is so much easier when I daydream the stories.

I go to a top school with a lot of actual real life "geniuses," and I can tell you that while they might be good at math or analytics, they are mostly very very bad at imagination. I think MDD can make you smarter, even genius-level, but it may not show up on your test results.

As to whether MDD poses a health risk, I agree with Michelle Young. I can say for myself that when I went through my MOST depressed and suicidal periods, it was the DD that SAVED my life. Without a doubt. 


The1andonlyAbber said:

The sad thing is I would probably be even smarter (maybe even a genius or something!) if my daydreams didn't make my brain so tired all the time. Because of MDD I cannot operate at 100% mental capacity and therefore reach my full potential in certain areas.

Hi everyone! I just wanted to say that MD can be beat. I beat it after it being apart of my life for about 8 or 9 years. For me, personally, one night while I was daydreaming (I pace while doing it) I just snapped out of it. It almost felt like having an epiphany. I just realized how this thing has affected my life and I thought about the person I could have been had it not happened, since it was so severe for 4 years, and it really scared me. I had a panic attack and I haven't been able to do it since. It's like I had one foot in daydreaming and one foot in reality and all of a sudden reality yanked me in all the way. I'm grateful that I'm free from it because I was scared it was going to last forever, but I'm glad it didn't. Now, I'm in the stage of accepting what it has done to me and moving on. I know a lot of you are struggling with MD and I guess I am an example of beating MD. I know the way I beat it will probably not happen for everyone but I hope all of you can continue to fight to beat this.  :)

I think so yes.

Since finding this group I have seen  a psychiatrist and  that has helped me to deal with some of my issues, some of which started my MD.  I am also meditating daily which has enabled me to focus more and control my MD. Each day I find myself MDing less and less. I am able for the first time ever to stop myself as soon as I sense myself being triggered, I am also starting to address my problems and face them head on instead of slipping away into my day dream world. I make sure that I am always occupied.  As boredom as well as stress can trigger my MD.  Sometimes I find that days can go by and I am not Mding at all.  It has to be one of the best things I have ever experienced.  It gives me hope that I  can rid myself of this permanently.

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